marijuana and running high

New Study Reveals Marijuana's Impact on Exercise: A Boost to Runners' High and Reduced Pain

July 19, 2023

A recent study has discovered a connection between marijuana and an enhanced exercise experience, specifically for running. The research conducted by experts at the University of Colorado Boulder involved surveying 49 runners about their running experiences, both with and without consuming cannabis. Published in the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, the study revealed some interesting findings.

The participants reported experiencing several positive effects during their cannabis-influenced runs. They reported feeling less negativity, increased positive emotions, tranquility, enjoyment, and dissociation. Additionally, they experienced more symptoms associated with the "runner's high," a euphoric feeling often experienced during intense exercise. Surprisingly, participants also reported lower pain levels after their cannabis-assisted runs, indicating a potential pain-reducing effect.

While the runners did run slightly slower after consuming marijuana, the researchers noted that the difference of 31 seconds per mile was not statistically significant. In other words, the slowdown was not substantial enough to draw definitive conclusions. Interestingly, the participants did not feel a difference in perceived exertion between the cannabis and non-cannabis runs.

The study's conclusion suggests that regular cannabis users may have a more positive exercise experience when using marijuana. However, the researchers emphasize the need for further investigation using diverse methodologies, different exercise types, and a broader range of participants to determine the long-term benefits and potential drawbacks associated with this behavior.

This study aligns with previous research conducted in 2019, which found that individuals who use marijuana as part of their workout routine tend to engage in a healthier amount of exercise. Similarly, a study from 2020 indicated that older individuals who consume cannabis are more likely to participate in physical activities.

Challenging common stereotypes, a 2021 study revealed that frequent marijuana consumers are actually more likely to be physically active compared to those who do not use cannabis.

Moreover, medical marijuana has been linked to significant improvements in the quality of life for individuals with conditions such as chronic pain and insomnia. These positive effects have been shown to persist over time, according to a study published this year by the American Medical Association (AMA).

In conclusion, while the use of cannabis during exercise appears to enhance the running experience and reduce pain, more research is needed to fully understand the long-term effects and whether these findings apply to a wider range of individuals and exercise settings.