Workplace Drug Testing Is Going To Die Because of Legal Weed

Workplace Drug Testing Is Going To Die Because of Legal Weed

June 20, 2017

By Maya Novikov.

The Washington Post became a newsmaker earlier this week, after an employee tweeted on plans to stop pre-hiring drug testing of the new staff members. Check the tweet here.

The possibility of such a decision of The Washington Post management has been discussed for more than a year. 

It is arguable that reviewing old drug testing policies is going to be a big trend in U.S. companies in the nearest future. If the weed is legal, and the job can be done safely under cannabis influence, why would an employer be concerned about marijuana consumption enough to spend money on drug testing? 

Current situation is creating a whole lot of consequences, like people easily cheating on drug tests by adding water to their urine, or other people making money on ‘weed detox sets’ that claim to free your system of cannabis traces in just three days. More than 93% test negative, but employers continue testing. In most cases, we just avoid working for companies that drug test employees. 

I have been smoking marijuana for more than a decade, beginning in my late teens. And I have never been tested for drug use in my life. Not in school, not in college, not at my work places (and I have had several), not by my doctor, not by the emergency room staff. My parents never tried to test me, too, if they wanted to know anything, they could just ask. 

Smoking weed has helped me so many times in various difficult job situations of my career. Sharing a joint can relieve tensions in a team. Lighting a bowl before a brainstorming session or a creative team meeting gets you more productive. A vaporizer can keep you awake when you need to concentrate on research for a really long time. 

Marijuana consumption is a healthier alternative to social tobacco smoking. People are more likely to work late hours it they are allowed to smoke weed in or near their office. And am not just talking about myself or my friends: I have seen many people in media, publishing, and entertainment business, benefited from cannabis use. 

I am not saying everyone should be smoking weed on their workplace. I even think the employers have right to ban marijuana in the office, and that they sometimes should do it for everyone’s safety and comfort. But testing people for drugs interferes with their lives and their free time. Someone can test positive only because he or she smoked marijuana during the weekend and if the weed is legal, why would an employer want to know about it?

Soon, many employers will find themselves deciding not to spend money on drug testing. The only losers would be drug testing companies and insurance companies. You would probably benefit from it.



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